File ptuneo used only for illustrative purpose
 
40% of deaths prevented by quitting smoking, eating healthier, boozing less Father-of-two claims his tumour went into remission after going on vegatables
 
The California Department of Health, United States (U.S.), warned that people need to keep their cell phones several feet away from them to reduce radiation exposure and health risks.
 
California released guidance for reducing exposure to cell phone radiation on Thursday, amid mounting evidence that cell phone use may be linked to cancer, attention, mental health and reproductive health issues.
 
Cell phones transmit information using low frequency radio signals, which may expose us to unhealthy radiation, especially when streaming or downloading large files.
Research has not been able to prove definitively that cell phone radiation is dangerous, but there have been enough studies linking the two to warrant caution, especially for children, according to the health department press release.
 
The statewide notice comes after several cities, including Berkeley and San Francisco, issued local warnings that their citizens should make some distance between their phones and their bodies.
 
The radiofrequency (RF) energy cell phones use to transmit information are at the bottom of the radiation totem poll, but research suggests that our frequent, close-range exposure to cell phones may be enough to endanger us.
 
Meanwhile, new research has concluded that nearly 40 per cent of cancer deaths could be prevented with eight simple lifestyle changes.
 
Quitting smoking, eating healthier and boozing less would help stop the disease, which claims 8.2 million lives worldwide each year.
 
Scientists suggest those three habits can be blamed for 30.4 per cent of all cancer deaths, around 2.5 million – with tobacco proving the biggest burden.
 
Five other habits, including excessive Ultra Violet (U.V.) radiation, obesity and not exercising enough can be blamed for a further 14.4 per cent of deaths – 1.2 million lives.
 
Also, a father-of-two who was given weeks to live has revealed he beat stage 4 colorectal cancer after switching to a vegan diet.
 
Rob Mooberry, now 43, told Daily Mail UK Online he was hospitalized with a perforated colon in July 2012, and scans revealed he had cancer which had spread to his bowels, lymph nodes and liver.
 
Doctors said the Las Vegas bartender would need a colostomy bag put in, followed by an ileostomy, then two bouts of chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
 
However, after the surgeries and the first round, with his cancer downgraded to stage 3A, he said he couldn’t take it any more and needed some time to detox his body of the chemicals before starting more treatment.
 
In November 2012, he started a plant-based diet, alkaline diet – akin to that of Tom Brady – with his vegetarian wife Amanda, now 39, following research that showed sugars and processed foods fueled tumors.
 
When it came to his next scan in early 2013, the cancer had shrunk by almost 80 percent.
 
Now he is celebrating five years cancer-free, raising 20-month-old twins, and running a small cancer charity on the side of his bar-tending to help other sufferers afford pipe dreams – and his story has gone viral, after it was tweeted by country star Tim McGraw.
 
“Keeping a phone directly on the body has never been a good idea,” says Dr. Devra Davis of the Environmental Health Trust.
 
In fact, cell phone makers themselves seem to agree. Apple, for example, includes an ‘RF exposure’ notice in the iPhone’s settings.
 
The notice explains that the iPhone’s RF emissions were tested at 5 mm – about the thickness of a fine point pen – from the body, and fall within the US standards of safety.
 
But it also includes advice for reducing exposure – not unlike California’s new guidance – by using speakerphone or hands free accessories.
 
“Most people are not aware that there is a clear warning to keep the phone off the body embedded in the phone,” says Davis.
 
This is particularly worrisome because most parents aren’t aware of these warnings are not managing their children’s exposure to phones.
 
The California guidance notes that RF may more easily penetrate the brain matter of children than that of adults. The exposure may also be more damaging and have more lasting effects on the developing brain.
 
Studies have shown evidence that cell phone exposure may cause tumors in the brain or ears, where the body is frequently in contact with the device.
 
Though research on RF’s effects on children specifically is fairly scarce, many psychologists have already warned that cell phone use may be linked to poorer attention, mental health and sleep for adolescents.
 
Less than a week ago, France banned cell phones from primary and middle schools. Though the ban’s goal was primarily related to mental health, it has drawn praise from experts worried about radiation exposure.
 
The country has also been at the forefront of research on the physical health effects of cell phone exposure.
 
“The French have tested the phones the way they are used” – touching the body – “and RF exposure exceeds the French standards by four more times, and apply that to the US standards, and it’s even much more than that – about seven times [the recommended levels],” says Davis.
 
Other research has shown strong links between RF and male sperm counts and sperm quality.
 
Studies in multiple countries “have show that men who keep phone in their pockets the longest have lowest sperm count, with most damage,” says Davis.
 
“Many people keep their phones in their pockets for hours a day, esp in the summer with thinner exposures will be far greater,” she adds.
 
Contemporary cell phone signals use ‘the weakest signals, but strength of the signals is not issue when comes to biological effect.’ It’s not the power, it’s the irregular nature of signal.’
 
The California guidelines address this by explaining that the most dangerous exposures happen when there are surges of RF energy. This happens when, essentially, the technology has to work harder to transmit information.
 
The state warns against close contact when phones have two or fewer bars of signal, when you’re in a moving car, or if you are trying to receive or send large quantities of data by streaming or downloading media.
 
Californians, the release advises, should use headsets, sleep with their phones away from them (not under pillows or on nightstands) and carry them in a bag, instead of in a pocket, bra or belt holster.
 
“The advice is welcome, and long overdue,” says Davis.
 
“California has a tradition of protecting public health, and we think this has been a long time coming,” she adds.
 
Researchers at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, said the total amount is greater than 38 per cent because many deaths involved two factors.
 
Even ‘small improvements’ would help reduce the risk of dying prematurely from cancer, the Australian researchers claimed.
 
Their findings, which also highlighted irresponsible sun tanning as a cause, were derived from an analysis of the country’s cancer deaths.
 
Figures showed 44,000 Australians died from the umbrella of diseases in 2013 – of which 38 per cent were deemed preventable.
 
Obesity and infections were responsible for five per cent of the deaths while not exercising enough was blamed for 0.8 per cent.
 
Dr. David Whiteman, lead researcher of the study published in the International Journal of Cancer, found that the bad habits fueled 41 per cent of cancer deaths in men and 34 per cent in women.
 
He said, “this is because men smoke and drink more, spend more time in the sun and don’t eat as well”, ScienceAlert reports.
 
The researchers concluded that the following eight habits are responsible for 38 per cent of cancer deaths.
 
Researchers at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, said the total amount is greater than 38 per cent because many deaths involved two factors.

“While in many cases cancer is tragically unavoidable, this study highlights what we’ve known for years: cancer isn’t always a matter of genetics or bad luck.”
 
Whiteman added: “There is a lot people can do to reduce their risk of developing and dying from cancer.

“Even small improvements in these areas would substantially reduce the number of people who die prematurely from cancer each year.”
 
The new findings back up research earlier this year which revealed the remaining two thirds of cancer cases can be blamed on DNA errors.
 
The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center study contradicted widespread belief that the disease is usually inherited or triggered by an unhealthy lifestyle.
 
Cancers triggered by copying errors could occur ‘no matter how perfect the environment’, the researchers warned in March.
 
The findings explained why cancer can often strike people who follow all of the rules of healthy living and have no family history of the disease.
 
Tobacco and alcohol have long been at the centre of strict regulation due to their substantial links to cancer and heart disease.
 
And an emerging body of evidence has shown poor diets, not exercising enough and obesity are fueling rates of cancer.
 
Speaking to Daily Mail Online, Rob admitted he was slightly overwhelmed at being tipped as a vegan advocate. “I’m not standing on my soap box saying everyone needs to go plant-based and vegan,’ he insisted. ‘But if you’re going to ask me what worked for me, I’ll tell you: this diet.”
 
When Rob was diagnosed he was shocked, having no family history of cancer and already living a healthy lifestyle of running regularly and eating a lean protein diet.
 
“I couldn’t believe it,’ he told Daily Mail Online. ‘I was always a healthy person, I didn’t expect it.”
 
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 File ptuneo used only for illustrative purpose   40% of deaths prevented by quitting smoking, eating healthier, boozing less Father-of-two claims his tumour went into remission after going on vegatables   The California Department of Health, United States (U.S.), warned that people need to keep their cell phones several feet away from them to...